Department of Pharmacology & Clinical Pharmacy

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About Department of Pharmacology & Clinical Pharmacy

Who works at the Department of Pharmacology & Clinical Pharmacy

Department of Pharmacology & Clinical Pharmacy has more than 21 academic staff members

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Dr. Walid Yousef Saad Tarsin

وليد تارسين هو احد اعضاء هيئة التدريس بقسم علم الادوية والصيدلة السريرية بكلية الصيدلة. يعمل السيد وليد تارسين بجامعة طرابلس كـأستاذ منذ 2014-09-17 وله العديد من المنشورات العلمية في مجال تخصصه

Publications

Some of publications in Department of Pharmacology & Clinical Pharmacy

Study of caffeine consumption rate and concentration in different food and beverages consumed by children

Caffeine has dose-dependent effects on mood, attention, and physiology. Behavioral effects of caffeine in humans have also been well documented. This article aimed to study the effect of different caffeine concentrations on behavior and motor activity of mice. The experiments was carried out using 24 male mice (25-30gm). Plus maze was used for screening of antianxiety effect of caffeine. While swimming maze was used to test antidepressant effect. Statistical analysis were performed using computer program SPSS (version 22). At dose of 100 mg/kg, caffeine acted as anxiolytic compound. Caffeine increased motor activity at dose of 25mg/kg and decreased motor activity at dose of 200mg/kg. At dose of 100mg/kg, caffeine acted as antidepressant. In conclusion, caffeine can act as stimulant, while in over dose it acts as depressant. Caffeine showed to have anxiolytic effect in certain doses. arabic 14 English 91
Sakina Salem Mohammed Saadawi, ٍSuhera Mehemed Abdulsalam Aburawi, SUMAYA ESEDEEG ABDALLAH BAAIO(4-2018)
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Effect of Caffeine at Different Concentrations on Behavior and Motor Activity in Mice

Aims: This article aimed to study the effect of different caffeine concentrations on behaviour and motor activity of mice. Place and Duration of Study: This study took place in Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Tripoli, and was conducted between 2017 to 2018. Methodology: The experiment was carried out using 24 male mice (25-30 gm). Plus maze was used for screening antianxiety effect of caffeine. While swimming maze was used to test the antidepressant effect. Descriptive statistics was performed using SPSS (version 22), followed by one sample Kolmogorov-Simirnov test. One-Way ANOVA was applied to compare between groups and Post Hoc test (LSD). Results: At a dose of 100 mg/kg, caffeine produce significant decrease in the duration of immobility using forced swimming maze; while the lower (25 mg/kg) and the higher (200 mg/kg) doses did not produce any changes compared to the control. In plus maze, Caffeine decreases the anxiety measure at the dose used of 100 mg/kg; but did not change the anxiety measure when lower (25 mg/kg) or higher (200 mg/kg) doses used compared to the control. The spontaneous motor activity was decreased significantly after administration of the higher dose of 200 mg/kg; the lower dose (25 mg/kg) showed insignificant increase, while the dose of 100 mg/kg produce insignificant decrease in the spontaneous motor activity. Conclusion: Caffeine has dose dependent effect, in a dose 100 mg/kg it produce anxiolytic and antidepressant like action, while lower (25 mg/kg) and higher (200 mg/kg) doses did not show any changes. Caffeine also produce dose dependent decrease in the spontaneous motor activity, this indicate that caffeine produce CNS depression with higher doses. arabic 12 English 73
Sakina S. Saadawi, Khairi A. Alennabi, Sumaya Baayo, Amera Fares, Najwa Alosta, Suher M. Aburawi(3-2020)
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Experimental study comparing burn healing effects of raw South African Shea butter and the samples from a Libyan market

Background: The fat extracted from the nut of the African Shea tree (Vitellaria paradoxa) is called Shea butter. It has multiple uses at the local level as it is used in cosmetic products and as a cocoa butter substitute in chocolate industries. It has a high nutritious value and is also a valuable product on the local, national, and international markets, making it the ideal candidate to research and invest in. Aim: This study is a comparative experimental study of the possible burn healing effects between imported South African raw Shea butter and samples in a Libyan market. Method: The control samples were brought from South Africa (Benin traditional markets). A total of 18 different samples were collected from different sale centers in Tripoli, including pharmacies, beauty shops, and spices shops, in addition to one sample brought from Poland. Animal experiment on burn healing effect was carried out on nine male Sprague Dawley (350–400 g) rats aged 6–8 weeks old. After shaving the animal’s dorsum hair, a metal cube was used to create a deep second degree burn wound, and the cube was heated to 100°C for 20 seconds. Medication with Shea butter (control, T1, and T2) was initiated daily for one for these groups by the application of a thin film of the Shea butter samples on the burned areas. On days 1, 3, and 7, the rats were anesthetised and a sample from the burned scar tissue and skin adjacent were evaluated using pathological parameters. Results: The histological study indicates that the use of Shea butter T1 as topical treatment induces an immune response, which enhances the form of the presence of a large number of inflammatory cells in the epidermis and dermis layers. The treatment of burned skin with T2 lasted for 72 hours and it showed slightly significant healing in the normal structure of proliferative granulation tissue with accumulation of fibroblasts and inflammatory cells surrounding the sebaceous glands and hair follicles. Small areas of the epidermis which formed few layers were observed and some hair roots were grown. This was well seen in cases of T1 and T2. Shea butter bought as raw might have a bad effect on burned skin. Conclusion: Shea butter bought as raw might have bad effect on burned skin. On the other hand, the sample from Poland had a therapeutic effect, which was because of the additives such as avocado oil, grape seed oil, and others. arabic 18 English 101
Sakina Salem Mohammed Saadawi, Soad Ali Abdulsalam Treesh, ٍSuhera Mehemed Abdulsalam Aburawi, , , (11-2020)
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