Dr. MansurShmela

Department of Preventive Medicine Faculty of Vet Medicine

Full name

Dr. Mansur Ennuri Moftah Shmela

َQualifications

Doctor of Phiosophy

Academic Rank

Assistant Professor

Biography

Mansur Shmela is one of the staff members at the department of 1 faculty of 6. He is working as a since 2014-09-02. He teaches several subjects in his major and has several puplications in the field of his interest.

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Contact Information

Qualifications

Doctor of Phiosophy

GENETICS
School of Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne; Australia
9 ,2014

Master degree

Master of Applied Science (Medical Laboratory Sciences), (GENETICS)
School of Medicine, RMIT University (Melbourne Australia)
9 ,2009

Bachelor Degree

Bachelor of Veterinary Sciences
Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Tripoli University, Libya.
9 ,1999

Publications

Radiographic Comparison of Carpal Morphometry in Thoroughbred and Standardbred Race horses

Carpal conformation is thought to contribute to the frequency of carpal pathology so non-invasive measurement of carpal morphometry would be useful to identify joints at risk. However, there are scant radiographic morphometrical details for the carpals of Thoroughbred (TB) and Standardbred (SB) racehorses even though these breeds differ in the incidence of carpal damage. This study aimed to identify morphometrical similarities and differences in carpal conformation in TB and SB. Thirty carpal dorsopalmar radiographs (DP) were collected from 15 TB and 15 SB. All DP radiographs were at zero degrees or within the acceptable range of rotation. Twelve carpal radiographic parameters were selected and measured on each radiograph. Statistical analysis found significant differences in four carpal parameters. These parameters revealed that the middle carpal joint in SB was significantly more angled distomedially whereas the radial distal metaphysis showed a greater distolateral inclination in TB. The radiocarpal and the carpometacarpal articulations exhibited common features in the two groups of horses. These carpal traits in TB and SB highlight their potential association with loading distribution and pathology. Measuring carpi from untrained and injured horses is necessary to establish breed specific features for the ideal carpal conformation in each of these breeds.
Aiman Hussein Saleh Oheida, Abdulrhman Mohamed Salah Alrtib, Aiman Abdulghader Salim Shalgum, Mansur Ennuri Moftah Shmela, Mohamed A Marzok, Helen M S Davies(4-2019)
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Blood profile in normal one humped dromedary (Camelus dromedarius) camel breeds in Libya. Part 3: Effect of sex variation on biochemical and haematological blood profile

As little is known about the blood profile of camels in Libya, this article is the third of a 4-part series describing the biochemical and haematological blood profile in Libyan camels. In part 1 of these manuscripts, the overall blood biochemical and haematological mean values of camels in Libya were determined, parts 2-4 evaluate the effects of breed, gender and age respectively on these values. Blood samples were collected from 24 male and 42 female apparently healthy camels and the levels of enzymes, metabolites, electrolytes and haematological indices were measured. The blood of the male camels showed higher values of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), Amylase (AMS), total proteins, globulin and Phosphorus (Ph), than the female camels which showed higher values of glucose, Albumin/Globulin (A/G) ratio, urea, Iron (Fe), Calcium (Ca), Packed Cell volume (PCV), Haemoglobin (Hb), erythrocyte osmotic fragility, Mean Corpuscular Volume (MCV), Mean Corpuscular Haemoglobin (MCH), neutrophil and monocyte numbers. This study shows significant sex differences between male and female Libyan camels in many haematological and biochemical analytes. arabic 28 English 141
Anwar Mustafa Abdalhadi Abdalmula, Fathia mahmoud Mohammad Ashour, Mansur Ennuri Moftah Shmela, Fahima A Alnagar, Ismail M Abograra, Amal Omar Elarif Buker(1-2019)


Blood profile in normal one humped dromedary (Camelus dromedarius) camel breeds in Libya. Part 2: Effect of breed variation on biochemical and haematological blood profile

Abstract As little is known about the blood profile of camels in libya, this article is the second of a 4-part series describing the biochemical and haematological blood profile in Libyan camels. In Part 1 of these manuscripts, the overall blood biochemical and haematological mean values of camels in Libya were determined, parts 2-4 evaluates the effects of breed, gender and age respectively on these values. Blood samples were collected from three camel breeds, namely, Fakhreya, Sirtaweya and Mahari, and the levels of enzymes, metabolites, electrolytes and haematological indices were measured. The blood of the Sirtaweya breed showed (i) higher levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), albumin and Phosphorus (Ph), than the other two breeds, (ii) higher levels of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), amylase (AMS) and total proteins than the Fakhreya breed and (iii) higher levels of glucose, triglycerides, total cholesterol, Very Low Density Lipoprotein (VLDL), Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL), Calcium (Ca), Packed Cell volume (PCV), Mean Corpuscular Volume (MCV) and Albumin/Globulin (A/G) ratio than the Mahari breed. The Fakhreya breed had (i) higher levels of urea, Iron (Fe), Haemoglobin (Hb), Mean Corpuscular Haemoglobin (MCH) and neutrophils number than the other two breeds, (ii) higher levels of glucose, A/G, LDL, Ca, PCV, MCV and monocytes number than the Mahari breed and (iii) higher levels of erythrocyte osmotic fragility, MCH and Mean Corpuscular Hemoglobin Concentration (MCHC) than the Sirtaweya breed. The Mahari breed had (i) higher levels of globulin than the other two breeds, (ii) higher levels of AMS than the Fakhreya breed and (iii) higher levels of erythrocyte osmotic fragility, Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR), MCHC than the Sirtaweya breed. The tested blood parameters in the three Libyan breeds in this study were affected by breed variations. arabic 28 English 143
Anwar Mustafa Abdalhadi Abdalmula, F. A. Alnagar, Amal Omar Elarif Buker, Fathia mahmoud Mohammad Ashour, I. M. Abograra , Mansur Ennuri Moftah Shmela(10-2018)


Blood profile in normal one humped dromedary (Camelus dromedarius) camel breeds in Libya. Part 1: Determination of biochemical and haematological blood profile

As little is known about the blood profile of camels in Libya, this article is the first of a 4-part series describing the biochemical and haematological blood profile in Libyan camels. Part 1 of these manuscripts determines the values of enzymes, metabolites, electrolytes and haematological indices in the blood of Libyan camels, parts 2-4 evaluates the effects of breed, gender and age respectively on these values. In this study, blood samples were collected from sixty six camels of three different breeds, different ages and with both sex. The blood of the studied camels showed (i) average values of Potassium (K), Calcium (Ca), Magnesium (Mg), Phosphorus (Ph), Haemoglobin (Hb), Packed Cell Volume (PCV) and White Blood Cell (WBC) counts (ii) low values of Sodium (Na), Iron (Fe), total proteins, albumin, globulin, creatinine, cholesterol, triglycerides, Mean Corpuscular Volume (MCV), Mean Corpuscular Haemoglobin (MCH), and low serum activity of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT) and amylase (AMS) enzymes and (iii) high values of glucose, urea, Red Blood Cell (RBC) counts, Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR) and Mean Corpuscular Haemoglobin Concentration (MCHC). The finding of this study was documented and compared with the findings of similar studies performed elsewhere. arabic 25 English 134
Anwar Mustafa Abdalhadi Abdalmula, Amal Omar Elarif Buker, Fathia mahmoud Mohammad Ashour, Mansur Ennuri Moftah Shmela, , Ismail M Abograra, , Fahima A Alnagar(8-2018)


Health adverse effects of formaldehyde exposure to students and staff in gross anatomy

Formaldehyde is an anxious gas used as a tissue preservative of cadavers in anatomy halls. Therefore, laboratory staff and students are at high risk of different clinical complications due to the continuous exposure to formaldehyde. The present questionnaire-based study evaluates the effects of formaldehyde exposure on veterinary students and staff in the anatomy gross dissection laboratory, University of Tripoli, Libya. A total of 104 students and 6 anatomy staff members completed a questionnaire of 24 questions related to the clinical symptoms observed after formaldehyde exposure and the answers were assessed using a six point (0-5) scale. Students had a high prevalence of nasal itching 78(75%), eyes burning 78(75%), excessive lacrimation 76(73%), eyes redness 60(58%), headache 64(62%) and respiratory distress 61(59%). Smoking and wearing glasses or gloves worsened many symptoms while wearing masks minimized other symptoms and male students were more affected than females. All anatomy staff members (100%) reported nasal itching, burning and congestion, eyes burning and redness, excessive lacrimation, cough and respiratory distress and less than that (83%) suffered from mouth dryness, headache, temporary loss of their ability to recognize the smell of formaldehyde and needed a physician assistance after the exposure to formaldehyde. The repeated exposure to formaldehyde in gross anatomy dissection has harmful effects on both students and staff member and finding alternative preservation methods, such as freezing, would be safer than using the formaldehyde. arabic 12 English 74
Fahima A Alnagar, Mansur Ennuri Moftah Shmela, , Abdulrhman Mohamed Salah Alrtib, , Fathia mahmoud Mohammad Ashour, Amal Omar Elarif Buker, Anwar Mustafa Abdalhadi Abdalmula(10-2015)


Genetic variants within the second intron of the KCNQ1 gene affect CTCF binding and confer a risk of Beckwith–Wiedemann syndrome upon maternal transmission.

Background Disruption of 11p15 imprinting results in two fetal growth disorders with opposite phenotypes: the Beckwith–Wiedemann (BWS; MIM 130650) and the Silver–Russell (SRS; MIM 180860) syndromes. DNA methylation defects account for 60% of BWS and SRS cases and, in most cases, occur without any identified mutation in a cis-acting regulatory sequence or a trans-acting factor. Methods We investigated whether 11p15 cis-acting sequence variants account for primary DNA methylation defects in patients with SRS and BWS with loss of DNA methylation at ICR1 and ICR2, respectively. Results We identified a 4.5 kb haplotype that, upon maternal transmission, is associated with a risk of ICR2 loss of DNA methylation in patients with BWS. This novel region is located within the second intron of the KCNQ1 gene, 170 kb upstream of the ICR2 imprinting centre and encompasses two CTCF binding sites. We showed that, within the 4.5 kb region, two SNPs (rs11823023 and rs179436) affect CTCF occupancy at DNA motifs flanking the CTCF 20 bp core motif. Conclusions This study shows that genetic variants confer a risk of DNA methylation defect with a parent-of-origin effect and highlights the crucial role of CTCF for the regulation of genomic imprinting of the CDKN1C/KCNQ1 domain. arabic 26 English 132
Julie Demars, Mansur Ennuri Moftah Shmela, Abdul Waheed Khan , Kai Syin Lee, Salah Azzi, Patrice Dehais, Irène Netchine, Sylvie Rossignol, Yves Le Bouc, Assam El-Osta, Christine Gicquel(7-2014)


Human diseases versus mouse models: insights into the regulation of genomic imprinting at the human 11p15/mouse distal chromosome 7 region

The 11p15 region is organised into two independent imprinted domains controlled by imprinting control regions, which carry opposite germline imprints. Dysregulation of 11p15 genomic imprinting results in two human fetal growth disorders (Silver-Russell syndrome (SRS, MIM 180860) and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS, MIM 130650)) with opposite growth phenotypes. The mouse orthologous region on distal chromosome 7 (dist7) is well conserved in its organisation and its regulation. Targeted mutagenesis in mice has provided highly valuable clues in terms of the mechanisms involved in the regulation of genomic imprinting of the 11p15/dist7 imprinted region. On the other hand, the recent identification of unexpected genetic defects in BWS and SRS patients also brought new insights into the mechanisms of 11p15 imprinting regulation. However, some mouse models and human genetic defects show contradictions in term of growth phenotypes and parental transmission. In this review, we extensively analyse those various mouse and human models and more particularly models with mutations affecting the two imprinting centres, in order to improve our understanding of regulation of 11p15/dist7 genomic imprinting. arabic 21 English 117
Mansur Ennuri Moftah Shmela, C. F. Gicquel(1-2013)
Publisher's website


Beckwith–Wiedemann syndrome caused by maternally inherited mutation of an OCT-binding motif in the IGF2/H19-imprinting control region, ICR1.

The imprinted expression of the IGF2 and H19 genes is controlled by the imprinting control region 1 (ICR1) located at chromosome 11p15.5. DNA methylation defects involving ICR1 result in two growth disorders with opposite phenotypes: an overgrowth disorder, the Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (maternal ICR1 hypermethylation in 10% of BWS cases) and a growth retardation disorder, the Silver-Russell syndrome (paternal ICR1 loss of methylation in 60% of SRS cases). In familial BWS, hypermethylation of ICR1 has been found in association with microdeletion of repetitive DNA motifs within ICR1 that bind the zinc finger protein CTCF; but more recently, ICR1 point mutations were described in BWS pedigrees. We present a case report of two brothers with BWS and prolonged post-pubertal growth resulting in very large stature. A maternally inherited point mutation was identified in ICR1 in both brothers, which altered binding of OCT transcription factors. The same mutation was present on the paternally inherited allele of their unaffected mother. This is a second report of a point mutation causing ICR1 hypermethylation by altering an OCT-binding motif. The atypical growth phenotype of the brothers may be connected to the unusual underlying cause of their BWS. arabic 24 English 118
Rebecca L Poole, Donald J Leith, Louise E Docherty, Mansur Ennuri Moftah Shmela, Christine Gicquel,, Miranda Splitt, I Karen Temple, Deborah J G Mackay(2-2012)
Publisher's website


Système IGF et croissance fœtale.

La croissance fœtale est un processus complexe dépendant de facteurs génétiques, environnementaux, nutritionnels et hormonaux d’origine maternelle, placentaire et fœtale. Le système IGF est l’un des systèmes hormonaux les plus importants pour la régulation de la croissance fœtale et placentaire [1]. Le gène IGF-II est régulé par le phénomène d’empreinte parentale et est exprimé seulement à partir de l’allèle paternel dans la majorité des tissus pendant la vie fœtale. Les gènes soumis à empreinte parentale sont régulés de manière spécifique et sont particulièrement vulnérables aux signaux environnementaux et nutritionnels. La dérégulation d’un groupe de gènes de la région 11p15 soumise à empreinte parentale, incluant le gène IGF-II, est responsable de deux pathologies de croissance fœtale (les syndromes de Silver-Russell, OMIM 180860 et de Wiedemann-Beckwith, OMIM 130650) qui ont une présentation phénotypique opposée. Ces deux syndromes représentent d’excellents modèles de pathologies humaines pour l’étude de la régulation de l’empreinte parentale. arabic 9 English 26
- Demars, J , S. Rossignol, Mansur Ennuri Moftah Shmela, I. Netchine, S. Azzi, A. El-Osta, Y. Le Bouc, C. Gicquel(1-2012)
Publisher's website


New insights into the pathogenesis of Beckwith-Wiedemann and Silver-Russell syndromes: contribution of small copy number variations to 11p15 imprinting defects

The imprinted 11p15 region is organized in two domains, each of them under the control of its own imprinting control region (ICR1 for the IGF2/H19 domain and ICR2 for the KCNQ1OT1/CDKN1C domain). Disruption of 11p15 imprinting results in two fetal growth disorders with opposite phenotypes: the Beckwith-Wiedemann (BWS) and the Silver-Russell (SRS) syndromes. Various 11p15 genetic and epigenetic defects have been demonstrated in BWS and SRS. Among them, isolated DNA methylation defects account for approximately 60% of patients. To investigate whether cryptic copy number variations (CNVs) involving only part of one of the two imprinted domains account for 11p15 isolated DNA methylation defects, we designed a single nucleotide polymorphism array covering the whole 11p15 imprinted region and genotyped 185 SRS or BWS cases with loss or gain of DNA methylation at either ICR1 or ICR2. We describe herein novel small gain and loss CNVs in six BWS or SRS patients, including maternally inherited cis-duplications involving only part of one of the two imprinted domains. We also show that ICR2 deletions do not account for BWS with ICR2 loss of methylation and that uniparental isodisomy involving only one of the two imprinted domains is not a mechanism for SRS or BWS. arabic 22 English 137
- Demars, J., S. Rossignol, I. Netchine, K. S. Lee, Mansur Ennuri Moftah Shmela, L. Faivre, J. Weill, S. Odent, S. Azzi, P. Callier, J. Lucas, C. Dubourg, J. Andrieux, Y. Le Bouc, A. El-Osta , C. Gicquel(10-2011)


Analysis of the IGF2/H19 imprinting control region uncovers new genetic defects, including mutations of OCT-binding sequences, in patients with 11p15 fetal growth disorders.

The imprinted expression of the IGF2 and H19 genes is controlled by the imprinting control region 1 (ICR1) located at chromosome 11p15.5. This methylation-sensitive chromatin insulator works by binding the zincfinger protein CTCF in a parent-specific manner. DNA methylation defects involving the ICR1 H19/IGF2 domain result in two growth disorders with opposite phenotypes: an overgrowth disorder, the Beckwith– Wiedemann syndrome (maternal ICR1 gain of methylation in 10% of BWS cases) and a growth retardation disorder, the Silver–Russell syndrome (paternal ICR1 loss of methylation in 60% of SRS cases). Although a few deletions removing part of ICR1 have been described in some familial BWS cases, little information is available regarding the mechanism of ICR1 DNA methylation defects. We investigated the CTCF gene and the ICR1 domain in 21 BWS patients with ICR1 gain of methylation and 16 SRS patients with ICR1 loss of methylation. We identified four constitutional ICR1 genetic defects in BWS patients, including a familial case. Three of those defects are newly identified imprinting defects consisting of small deletions and a single mutation, which do not involve one of the CTCF binding sites. Moreover, two of those defects affect OCT-binding sequences which are suggested to maintain the unmethylated state of the maternal allele. A single-nucleotide variation was identified in a SRS patient. Our data extends the spectrum of constitutive genetic ICR1 abnormalities and suggests that extensive and accurate analysis of ICR1 is required for appropriate genetic counseling in BWS patients with ICR1 gain of methylation.
Demars, J., Mansur Ennuri Moftah Shmela, S. Rossignol, J. Okabe, I. Netchine, S. Azzi, S. Cabrol, C. Le Caignec, A. David , Y. Le Bouc, A. El-Osta , C. Gicquel(9-2010)
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Regulation of genomic imprinting at the human 11p15 region

The human 11p15 region is divided into two independent imprinted domains, the H19/IGF2 and CDKN1C/KCNQ1 domains. Each domain is regulated by its own imprinting control regions, ICR1 and ICR2, which carry opposite germline imprints. The expression of 11p15 imprinted genes is regulated by two major mechanisms. ICR1 binds a zinc finger protein (CTCF) on the unmethylated maternal allele and acts as a chromatin insulator, whereas ICR2 is unmethylated on the paternal allele and serves as a promoter for a regulatory non-coding RNA (KCNQ1OT1). Dysregulation of 11p15 genomic imprinting results in two human foetal growth disorders: the Beckwith-Wiedemann (BWS) and the Silver-Russell (SRS) syndromes, which display opposite growth phenotypes. Various 11p15 epigenetic and genetic defects result in BWS and SRS. Gain or loss of DNA methylation account for 60% of BWS and SRS and, in most cases, the mechanism of the DNA methylation defect is unknown. The overall aim of this thesis was to decipher the mechanisms resulting in loss or gain of DNA methylation at ICR1 or ICR2 by investigating large cohorts of BWS and SRS patients displaying a “primary” DNA methylation defect. We aimed at establishing what was the incidence of copy number variations (CNVs) (duplications, deletions and segmental uniparental isodisomies) confined to one or one part of the H19/IGF2 or CDKN1C/KCNQ1 domains. We also screened extensively the ICR1 imprinting control region in BWS and SRS patients to identify new genetic defects. We show in this work that genetic defects in cis account for a significant proportion (approximately 30%) of BWS patients with ICR1 gain of DNA methylation but are rare in SRS and BWS patients with loss of DNA methylation at ICR1 and ICR2, respectively. We describe novel small gain and loss CNVs involving only part of the two domains in BWS and SRS. We also describe, for the first time, mutations and small deletions involving binding sites for the OCT4 and SOX2 pluripotency factors. Those defects account for approximately 14% of BWS cases and result in a BWS phenotype upon maternal transmission. We further characterize the role of OCT4/SOX2 pluripotency factors in the maintenance of genomic imprinting at the H19/IGF2 domain in mouse embryonic stem cells. By screening the whole 11p15 region for susceptibility alleles for loss or gain of DNA methylation, our group identified a novel 4.5 kb cis-regulatory region within the CDKN1C/KCNQ1 domain. A specific 4.5 kb haplotype confers, upon maternal transmission, a risk of ICR2 loss of DNA methylation in BWS patients. This study investigated the mechanism involved in the risk of ICR2 loss of DNA methylation in BWS and showed that within this 4.5 kb region, two SNPs (rs11823023 and rs179436) affect CTCF occupancy at DNA motifs flanking the CTCF 20 bp core motifs. This study identifies a new cis-regulatory region and highlights the crucial role of CTCF for the regulation of genomic imprinting at the CDKN1C/KCNQ1 domain. These recent findings bring new insights in the regulation of genomic imprinting at both the IGF2/H19 and CDKN1C/KCNQ1 domains. arabic 8 English 50
Mansur Ennuri Moftah Shmela(9-2014)